Chernobyl Nuclear Meltdown Still The Gold Standard | 1986

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Still the Gold Standard

Still the Gold Standard of Nuclear Mishaps

Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster Still the Gold Standard

The official Russian death toll number is 43; the real number is closer to one million

In April of 1986, the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, Ukraine blew up and caught fire. Two men died immediately, and thirty others over the next few months (generally firemen who fought the blaze). The causes of death were radiation burns and radiation sickness. It was the worst nuclear disaster of all time, with the exception of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but that doesn’t count*. The U.S. was forced to do that to save lives and has proven over the years to be the only nation responsible and moral enough to handle nukes.

The official estimate of the radiation release was between 30 and 50 million Cures of radioactive substances, including volatile iodine and cesium. About 135,000 people were evacuated from an area within about 20 miles of the reactor, along with glowing livestock. Even using the inflated standard of acceptible exposure employed by the Soviets, people hundreds of miles away were seriously affected.

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* The U.S. was forced to do that to save lives and scare the oncoming Ruskies. We have proven over the years to be the only nation responsible and moral enough to handle nukes.

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